IzzyEllie

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IzzyEllie last won the day on October 11

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About IzzyEllie

  • Rank
    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 09/23/1989

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Hangzhou
  • Interests
    Painting in acrylics. Procrastinating. Drawing silly cartoons. Drawing the figure. Really, doing any art thing crazy fast and messily until i have to run somewhere without noticing there's charcoal smeared all over my face. Performing. Zoning out in front of the PS2. Miyazaki and Tim Burton movies. Eating way to many pickled foods. Hamburgers. Baking. Playing around w the corinet and piano. And I guess my baby and husband are pretty cool too...

Country

  • Country/ Region
    United States
  1. Hi Hello lovely Hangzhou-ers! It's been a while! I moved back to the States about three years ago and launched my portrait art business. I am doing well here in the states (signed to agency, etc.) but am wanting to somehow expand to do work in China, as I'm incredibly missing my second home, Hangzhou. I was was hoping to find some way to get commissions in China, to pay at least for my airfare to come back to Hangzhou, once a year, and meet with clients to do the initial prep work for portrait paintings (shooting the reference photos, doing oil sketchs from life, etc.) I basically want to justify and fund a visit back yearly. Does anyone have any idea of what the art market is like in Hangzhou? What is the art gallery scene is like? Do any of the galleries represent foreigners or non-modern artists? I looked at a couple of galleries in Hangzhou online and all the artist were Chinese and all the art looked very nouveau, modernist and my work is brushy contemporary realism, along the lines of John Singer Sargent... I was also curious if anyone had any ideas of a good marketing strategy or what the reception might be for commissioning portraits in China? Most people in the States that get portraits done either want to get their kids painted or it's some wealthy family's tradition to get them done of all the family members. Neither of which I saw people doing in China... I was thinking maybe if I marketed portrait paintings as something to get done for your wedding that it might fit better with the culture. I know the Chinese wedding scene involves huge elaborate photo shoots and video shoots and basically just throwing huge piles of money at anything that's wedding related. Would love to hear anyone's thoughts on my ideas! Whether you think there's no market for it and it would tank or you think there might be a way to make it work. Or how it could work! Or anything you know about local art galleries! I would love to hear any and all ideas! This was really long.. sorry.. Thank you! I love that there's this community to ask this to! Izzy (I'm throwing in a couple pictures of my work, in case it helps)
  2. Soo.. back in the states reading about China's continuing trouble controlling the stock market while their trying to make it more free-market without allowing political reform.. http://finance.yahoo.com/news/gauging-the-global-implications-of-china-s-manic-stock-market-225719655.html# "realizing the run-up was unsustainable, rushed to the exits sending the Shanghai Composite down a gut-wrenching 32% in 18 days despite China's best efforts to stem the selling" Pretty difficult to navigate I would suspect. How are things over in the East? Anyone seeing any of this showing up in their day-to-day lives? Are people still as optimistic about China's financial future as they were when I was there? When I was in Hangzhou last year, if I ever mentioned the housing market bubble to a native (i.e. China creating entire cities where no one lives just to create construction jobs and everyone investing their money in the housing market), it was completely brushed off with a "China's economy's always going to get better. It's will never crash." "…Well, why not?" "It just won't. It's always gone up." "Which is the definition of a bubble…" http://www.theplaidzebra.com/ghost-city-china/
  3. Hi Hi! Sorry everyone! Since moving back to the states, I haven't checked here in a while. Our ayi is still in Hangzhou and has found some sort of job at a Lian Hua grocery. Probably because all of her references are from non-Chinese speakers who then leave the country. *Sigh* If anyone is still looking for an ayi and wants to give her a call (or have someone call for you if you don't speak chinese), her name is Xiao Jiang and her number is 13634115760. She was the sweetest, most loving, hard working, trust worthy ayi in the world. Can't recommend her enough. Izzy
  4. Hi Hi! Sorry everyone! Since moving back to the states, I haven't checked here in a while. Our ayi is still in Hangzhou and has found some sort of job at a Lian Hua grocery. Probably because all of her references are from non-Chinese speakers who then leave the country. *Sigh* If anyone is still looking for an ayi and wants to give her a call (or have someone call for you if you don't speak chinese), her name is Xiao Jiang and her number is 13634115760. She was the sweetest, most loving, hard working, trust worthy ayi in the world. Can't recommend her enough. Izzy
  5. Did they end up making an english version? Did ya find it? :)
  6. So my husband and I are moving to America...like immediately and just found out that it was going to be waaay more than our ticket prices, and more than we could afford to bring back our loyal pooch. So sadly we're having to look for a new home for him. He's a sweety. A fully grown Golden Retriever that loves people and is good with kids. He's been taught how to Heel, Stay, Sit, and Come (all commands were taught in English) and he grew up around our little son (2 years old) so he's used to kids and is really good about not knocking them him over or attacking him with kisses, like some dogs do. He loves to go on walks and play fetch. We're asking 500 yuan for him because we really want to have him find a good home. We'd give him away since we're leaving so soon, but in China, I feel like a price is needed to insure he's not going to some crazy peoples wanting to dog fight or cook him up for dinner. I could only find some picture of him when he was younger, but I'll update with some more recent pics in a couple hours. If interested, please shoot me a message here, or give my husband (Lark) a call at 13346182766. REAally need to find him a home quickly, so if you're at all interested in acquiring an awesome new best friend, please contact us and we'll set up a meet and greet. Thank you! Izzy Larkin and mowgli 2.tiff
  7. They are pretty small, so you wouldn't have any trouble fitting them in a taxi, we live next to the chengxi in time (城西银泰) on fengtan road and ping shui road intersection 丰潭路萍水街路口 If I had known earlier I could have taken it down there for you, but we are leaving on Tuesday, so tomorrow is really the last day to get it. My phone number is 13346182766, we will either be at home or have someone at home all day tomorrow so anytime works for us. We also have someone at home today, so either way works.
  8. So I have this weird theory that since most Chinese kids sleep with their parents until their like 5 or 6 years old, they are used to having interrupted sleep (people turn over or make noises in their sleep). So they've become used to not getting deep sleep or something. I think it's why so many of my friends complain that they can't get to sleep for hours at night, but then can fall asleep for a nap, just at their desk at work. Just learned bad sleep continuing and turning into mild insomnia/narcolepsy.
  9. Meh. I could do with a little less simplicity. Before I became my super pregnant self, I was really skinny tall person with a pixie cut and no matter if I was wearing makeup or a dress, I would always get, "Are you a boy or a girl?" Or "WAaaah! I thought you were a man!" after I'd said something. I don't see how that wouldn't be offensive if they said that to other Chinese people..
  10. My husband and I were both spanked as children and we spank our son. We (or mainly I) weren't going to originally, but then realized quickly that nothing else really worked for our little munchkin. He was too young to understand a big lecture about consequences and danger and how our actions make other people feel. So now he knows that if he walks over and tries to stick his finger into an electrical outlet, I'm going to swat his hand. Or, if he runs away from me toward the street when I'm telling him to come, his bottom will get smacked. It's an instead cause and effect that he can understand and (in our case) has kept him from getting himself into serious trouble or danger.
  11. I think I wouldn't put "War" and "Wolf" in the same title at all. Although if you're shooting for a tongue twister, "Woman War Wolf" is a win. Say that 5 times fast. How about: The She-Wolf She-Wolf on the Battle Lines Fighting Lady Wolf
  12. I haven't been, but a friend mentioned that the Vineyard has some sort of brunch deal with pancakes etc. starting at 11:30. I'm psyched to go try it out.
  13. Roller blading is at any open public square after the sun sets. Bunches of kids take lessons and skate between little cones and really good older skaters zip around with headphones in, trying to run over anyone walking by.
  14. There's an ice skating rink in the In Time mall across the street from me. Chen xi (spelling?) In time Mall at ping shui jie and feng tan lu intersection.
  15. Haha! right?! I get lectured a lot but my son hasn't gotten heat stroke or died of a cold yet, so I think I'm doing pretty okay.