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Hangzhou Expat

sainthood

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sainthood last won the day on December 29 2017

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About sainthood

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  • Birthday 01/01/1970

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    Somewhere over the rainbow

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    Australia
  1. New friends in Hangzhou

    A dinner group sounds like a great idea! I don't know of one here (officially). Perhaps you could start one?? You'll have to be easy going on coffee dates... there aren't too many good coffee joints around :p
  2. Girl looking to Meet New people

    I'd love to see a swimming netball team! Can you only kick with one leg when you have the ball??
  3. Coming to HZ, need someone to give me info!

    Re: cost of things. Sometimes, if you're lucky, there's a price tag. You pay the price according to the tag. (however, that's not guaranteed... sometimes you need to add in 'foreigner tax' - which can be as much as 100%). Re Rent: You ask an agent to help you find a place, they show you around a number of places that very much do not meet the requirements you gave them, and at prices outside your budget. Then, finally, you get exasperated, and give in. You sign a contract and pay a couple of months up front and 1-3 month's deposit. (If you want an official receipt, you have to pay more... )You are then entitled to move your stuff in, and to have the landlord come around whenever they feel like it (and sometimes let themselves in - whether you're there or not), and look all over your stuff. If you have any complaints or things that need fixing, it won't happen unless you do it/pay for it yourself. Some landlords or agents will expect you to pay for things like electricity, water, gas, etc. If you give them money, don't expect it to go to the relevant organisation... Also, many will expect you to pay the bi-annual property maintenance fees (which is calculated on parts of the apartment you can't use). If there's any serious weather, they will ask you to pay more to the groundskeepers to do their job - you know, the job that they're already paid for (out of the property management fees you've just been asked to cough up). At the end of the lease, anything you've moved, changed, marked, or whatever - and anything that was damaged/not working before you moved in - will come out of your deposit (assuming you actually get any back!) Electricity, water, gas is all relatively easy to deal with (unless your electricity is done via a card which you have to top up... at only 1 place, which is open only when you're not free... even if the stated times say otherwise). With those utilities, some can be paid through Wechat, and others through a bank. Just take the bill there, hand over, hand over cash. Nod head to anything they say/ask. (ignore they're comments to workmates about having to deal with foreigners!) There shouldn't be any deposits. Internet... go to one of the authorised shops to be lied to about their service that you'll never be able to get or speeds that can't be achieved. Hand over passport and lease agreement. You'll have crappy internet in your home within about 3 days (at times that can surprise you - either so quickly, or so damn long. Any arranged times are irrelevant). I was paying 2000RMB for a year of "20mb/sec". (they use the wrong letter there in the speed... should be 'k').
  4. Incoming from Australia

    "I am really looking forward to experience Hangzhou and immerse myself in the Chinese culture." No, you're not. And no, you won't. What we think of as 'Chinese culture' isn't actually here :( It's history.. long gone! Think of what Christmas means to most in Australia now... compared to what it used to mean and its origins. You'll feel vastly more at home here than what you currently imagine! (I know - I sound jaded and pessimistic. But, come back to me in a year and respond) As said above - China isn't a coffee place. But, there are some cafes around that aren't too bad.
  5. Hello all, new member in Australia

    Hi Noel. Firstly, take your glossy brochure and burn it. It's a complete waste of time. Secondly, you're probably going to need to re-evaluate your use of the word 'culture'. And, whatever your imagination has told you about China, it's probably wrong now... you should google Beijing and Shanghai, and expect that that's what a lot of this place is like (unless it's a poor western area... in which case it's much worse version of BJ and SH). And, by that I mean - it's sort of just like home - but only slightly different. The people are people.. with a different attitude to what you might be expecting. Some are great, and easy to get along with. Some are arseholes (that sometimes make the news for how bad they are). They watch TV (crap soapies and dramas, 'reality' shows, lots and lots and lots of war movies (the government is still cashing in on WWII and how bad the Japanese are!), and heavily propagandised 'news'). People drive cars. Wear jeans, t-shirts, suits, dresses. Go to work. Play video games. Go shopping. Get married. Have kids.... all pretty much the same as what you're used to... so.... what are you expecting to find? (also - I find many (not all!!) Chinese to be the most ignorantly nationalistic people I've ever met! (Even worse than the you-know-who!) What I mean by this is the idea that China has done everything awesome, and much better than anywhere else in the world! And, invented things long before anyone else! (the list you would find incredible!) Did you know ping-pong was invented in China? (it wasn't - it was invented in England!) And Badminton?? (Nope - probably India). You will be congratulated on your ability to say 'thank you' in Chinese, or to use chopsticks. And, there are subjects you should never mention, unless you want a prolonged (ignorance-filled) argument which you won't win. The most popular sport here is... basketball! Popular phone... Apple. Fashion? LV, Gucci, Prada, etc. Cars? Audi, BMW, Ferrari, Lambourghini. The only think that is stereotypically Chinese that Chinese people go for is their food.(except, of course, when they have money to go to Starbucks, McDonalds or Burgerking). Don't get me wrong.. I am NOT saying China is a bad place, and you shouldn't come! I'm just saying... it's probably not the culture capital you may be hoping! (granted... where is these days?)
  6. Internet Censorship Crazy in China...

    Cos, quite often, San is the troll!
  7. TMS is a looooonnnggggg road....
  8. Hello everyone

    Purdy!!!
  9. Phone repair/ Buying a phone

    You know, it's precisely because of the rampant fakeness that the locals are used to that allows me to prosper here - by bringing in something real that exposes the bad and the fake for what it is - to those who are no longer willing to accept the crap and bullshit..
  10. You don't seem to know the meaning of the word 'spam' (in this context) It means to post the same thing repeatedly in a short period of time - usually for advertising purposes. In this case, you had the same post up 3 times within about 2 minutes! And, then, you had to add to it by putting up a meaningless emote as a 'post' to help bump this thread to the top.... So, of your 5 post count, you have a couple of repeats and a smiley.... Great first impression!!
  11. bottled water 5 gallon delivered

    I get Nongfu for 18. when they come, they'll swap out your empty jug for the full one - so don't order too early (ie, before it's about out, and you can't put the rest into a bottle or something). Or, buy yourself another jug (about 40RMB) and have 2 - then you can swap out when you like (which is handy for when you're running low/out, and they don't have any water in! Cos, a 5L bottle is 10RMB.. so close to 2 times the price of the 19L
  12. Hello, new to Hangzhou!

    I'm about to start up the best IELTS training school in the country! I'd been trying to find an investor to give me a stack of start up cash, but have just discovered that I don't really need it! So, going it alone... That, and sleeping (to sleep, perchance to dream!) Also doing a lot of procrastinating.... which is going extremely well!
  13. bottled water 5 gallon delivered

    There will be a local shop that delivers. It won't be any less reputable than any other organisation (including the bottled water companies).
  14. Again - you're both only referring to a negative connotation of the term that has been put in place by conservative elements as a backlash to legitimate political stances (that they can't actually defend against). I asked San some posts before - what term to you use for those who legitimately fight against social injustices? No response! You've had the wool pulled over your eyes! You guys now see any attempts to right wrongs at a societal level as negative, and anyone who tries to do so (idealists) as 'SJWs' with the negative connotation! Social engineering project successful! (see also "Doublespeak" and "Doublethink")
  15. That wouldn't surprise me.... justice for us, not justice for all... Also... most SJWs aren't violent, and preach non-violence... "In the past" is only a couple of years ago... and SOME take it to have a negative connotation -= namely, those who are against such ideals! As I wrote above - it's the conservatives who hate having to accept another way of being that turned the term into a negative. NOT all those who actually agree with their ideals and policies. That is - YOU use the term as a negative, I (and others) don't. As much as it'd be nice if everyone just conformed to any one particular view of the world, that ain't gonna happen any time soon... If that's the way you need to justify it - go ahead! But, many people who are actually out there trying to bring about particular changes (particularly for those not including themselves) will still be using that term to refer to themselves. (well, accept it as such).
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