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dominic1992

persian man says hi, needs help with job

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hey everybody im new here on x visa i badly need to find a job, i am an english teacher with a 500 hour tefl degree from ITD college in Canada, two years experience with recommendation letter from the biggest IELTS teaching center in west of iran,can anyone help? 

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I am not a racist, but your nationality may be a problem for you to get a teaching job. 

 

and sorry to say that teacher's appearance is more important than teaching ability here.  anyway you can find the contacts of schools at Teaching in Hangzho forum

 

Good luck, Dominic

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Yes buddy, what Jake wrote is very true.

He is not being racist he is just telling you the truth and it is not applicable just for English teaching, it is true here for most of other jobs.

Here origin of your passport and your appearance counts much more than your merit and ability.

I am not an English teacher so i am not sure about that area but at least in my working sphere i have noticed that because of this mentality here a lot of under qualified people get chance instead of people with good qualification and merit.

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I'm somewhat new here myself Dominic, but I get the impression that these east coast cities have a good number of native English speaking westerners, and reasonable or not that's what the locals seem to want, though I think they're becoming more reasonable (with your credentials I'm sure you can do a much better job at ESL teaching than 90+% of native speakers, but they haven't seemed to realize that here). I hear it'd be easier for you to find work in western cities such as in Sichuan province, who knows they might pass you off as an American for the parents to see (I hear they do that with Russians at least).

 

Another possibility is going to western-style bars and restaurants such as Maya, Vineyard, etc, just talking with people, as a number of people have mentioned jobs there, there's always people coming and going. I know a number of eastern Europeans and South Americans that are working here in the ESL field. Anyways I'm sure you'll find a job, good luck to you.

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hey everybody im new here on x visa i badly need to find a job, i am an english teacher with a 500 hour tefl degree from ITD college in Canada, two years experience with recommendation letter from the biggest IELTS teaching center in west of iran,can anyone help?

Hi Dominic,

Don't be discouraged of the comments here. There are schools who also look for people who actually know how to teach and not depending their judgment solely on people's skin tone. If a school sees you're worth every dime,they'll hire you and they'll use all the connections they have to provide you a z visa.

Could you leave any infos on how to keep you posted of any vacancies?

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I don't think he has a bachelor though? Best off going to a different less popular city, easier to get jobs as someone who isn't white, lower salary but also lower cost of living.

 

Alternatively you could try to tutor some kids on the side while doing your schooling.

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Hi Dominic,

Don't be discouraged of the comments here. There are schools who also look for people who actually know how to teach and not depending their judgment solely on people's skin tone. If a school sees you're worth every dime,they'll hire you and they'll use all the connections they have to provide you a z visa.

Could you leave any infos on how to keep you posted of any vacancies?

hi sure sorry ive been away recently heres my phone number 18658147237

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I don't think he has a bachelor though? Best off going to a different less popular city, easier to get jobs as someone who isn't white, lower salary but also lower cost of living.

 

Alternatively you could try to tutor some kids on the side while doing your schooling.

true that

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I'm somewhat new here myself Dominic, but I get the impression that these east coast cities have a good number of native English speaking westerners, and reasonable or not that's what the locals seem to want, though I think they're becoming more reasonable (with your credentials I'm sure you can do a much better job at ESL teaching than 90+% of native speakers, but they haven't seemed to realize that here). I hear it'd be easier for you to find work in western cities such as in Sichuan province, who knows they might pass you off as an American for the parents to see (I hear they do that with Russians at least).

 

Another possibility is going to western-style bars and restaurants such as Maya, Vineyard, etc, just talking with people, as a number of people have mentioned jobs there, there's always people coming and going. I know a number of eastern Europeans and South Americans that are working here in the ESL field. Anyways I'm sure you'll find a job, good luck to you.

thats so true, you know i believe this hypothesis is just idiotic that a native speaker of a language is absolutely better than a non-native one. i didnt know that until i started teaching my native language. i didn't know the methods, i had not studied the language, i had not taken the pedagogy... i realized that i just speak this language, and i just suck at teaching it! i believe i make a better English teacher than a Persian one. however, this idea is what works here no matter what. and i do appreciate your suggestions sir. it's nice to see people read and care. thank you

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Yes buddy, what Jake wrote is very true.

He is not being racist he is just telling you the truth and it is not applicable just for English teaching, it is true here for most of other jobs.

Here origin of your passport and your appearance counts much more than your merit and ability.

I am not an English teacher so i am not sure about that area but at least in my working sphere i have noticed that because of this mentality here a lot of under qualified people get chance instead of people with good qualification and merit.

u are right. you know once i used to teach farsi to an american who thought English here in hangzhou and i wanted to exemplify the fact that how different letters can sound the same in a word, ergo i asked him to spell the word "necessary" for me so i could let him see that the two different letters (C and S) sound alike, but he said he didn't know how to spell it! i don't blame him, i sometimes find myself having hard time spelling some words in Farsi. and i guess it's just fine, some people don't care about writing or reading skills, they just want to learn how to speak a language. i guess its pretty much reasonable to ask a native speaker. 

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"Thats so true, you know i believe this hypothesis is just idiotic that a native speaker of a language is absolutely better than a non-native one. i didnt know that until i started teaching my native language. i didn't know the methods, i had not studied the language, i had not taken the pedagogy... i realized that i just speak this language, and i just suck at teaching it! i believe i make a better English teacher than a Persian one. however, this idea is what works here no matter what. and i do appreciate your suggestions sir. it's nice to see people read and care. thank you"

I think it's mostly idiotic too, but at the same time if I went into, say, a Thai Boxing training school in the US, and I saw it had one or two real Thai boxers on its staff, I would assume it likely has some authenticity. I think it's the same here, it's not a "real" English school unless it has "real" westerners, at least in many minds.

One other reason about the NES obsession: in theory the Chinese teachers can teach everything but conversation. Work permits are only for services that non-locals cannot supply, and they (again in theory) can do everything but teach pronunciation/conversation. Hence the obsession over native speakers.

One more thought: I speak reasonably good Spanish (more than survival) but only studied with non-native-Spanish-speaking teachers. I might not have the pronunciation exactly right, but it's good enough.

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Sam has touched on one aspect of teaching that has not been mentioned in other posts.  He writes "...in theory the Chinese  teachers can teach everything but conversation.'   "Conversation" is the key word in this thought.   As teachers of foreign languages the Chinese teachers and methods excel.  The are far better than anything I have encountered in the US or Europe.  Young people graduating from a middle school or university here have far better (English) language skills than their counterparts in other countries.  The Chinese students have a mastery of grammar and a very large vocabulary.  The only problem:   They can't use this vast knowledge.   It's pretty difficult for a Chinese middle school teacher, who has a class load of 50 students two or three times per day to "teach" conversation.  Do the math:  45 minute class; 50 students.   That's about 50 seconds of speaking time per student.  It just ain't possible!!!

 

That's where the native speaker comes in.   We are usually employed not to teach grammar, spelling, vocabulary (The Chinese teachers do a magnificent job of that) but to get the kids to practice what they have learned.  It's really difficult for a student to use a foreign language.   They are afraid that their classmates will laugh at them, they are trying something new and this makes them afraid/shy to try to speak. 

 

As many of the above writers have stated, "native" speakers very often have a poor grasp of their native grammar, spelling, usage, etc.  But, BOY can they speak!!!    However, speaking and speaking well are two different skills.  My granddaughter's friend, 18 years old, native speaker cannot speak a complete, meaningful sentence without adding words such as "whatever", "you know" "you know what I mean" and other such idiotic statements.   She will spend her life flipping burgers at McDon's.   Unfortunately for the Chinese students, some schools/training centers hire "white" foreigners with blue passports because they look European, not for their teaching or oral skills.   A young Canadian boy posted some years ago that he had not finished high school, had been a "ski bum" for a number of years, had never had a job but was in China and had been teaching oral English simply because he was a native speaker.  

 

Foreign teachers (the ones whom I know) have the skills to encourage the students to use their knowledge; to bring the kids out of their shell; to make them less shy and afraid.   These teachers can and do help the kids with grammar, spelling, literature, history and other knowledge, but they do not teach these skills because the Chinese teachers can do it better." 

 

One of the problems that native speakers face is that of "accent" or "pronunciation".   Native English speakers come from England, Canada, USA, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, many countries in Africa and Asia.  Do they all speak "English"?   NOPE!  They all speak national dialects (which all have regional accents)  Do all native speakers share a mutually accented language?? Again, NO.   Probably the only speakers who share the same, international accent are those speakers who have learned English as a second language.   A Nigerian can speak with a Pakistani, Chinese, German, Brazilian or anyone else who has learned English.  They will all share a similar vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation.  The only "difficulty" will be to understand due to speed of pronunciation or national usage of words (American English:  sidewalk, trunk (of a car).  British English:  pavement, boot (of a car). 

 

None of this answers the main question of this topic:  preference for European/white native speakers, but it may shed some light on why this is so.   It's not an easy answer and there may never be an answer.   But, hey, it's always a question.

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