Gabby Bravo

HAIDA recruiter, any opinions?

25 posts in this topic

Hello everyone!
I will be living in China soon as an english teacher through a recruiter called HAIDA.
Would like to know if anyone has heard of this recruiter agency and would like to share some comments about it?
Would really appreciate it!!

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Looking for a job ? The job is looking for you too !  Please UPLOAD/BUILD your resume first → HERE.

Interesting... I've heard they are ok... but that's just hearsay, so don't take my word for it!!!

Gabby - does the flag under your pic indicate your actual nationality? If so, a) do you have dual citizenship with a different country, and if not, b) did you do a bachelor (or above) degree in an English speaking country?

If you have 'no' to both, then legally you can't work here as an English teacher! And, thus, no matter what they may tell you, and what others may say, they can't be trusted on that alone.

As for the link San provided, and the information on it regarding pay... yes, if you go through a recruiter, that's what you can expect. They will take a large cut of the money the school pays to the recruiter. Most schools aren't legally allowed to hire foreigners, but some agencies ARE allowed to do it for them. If you're happy with the pay, just accept it! If you're not, then don't!

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1 hour ago, Dan.Tan said:
  • The girl on the right in the pic can teach in China, while the left can't! And I vote for that.

Dafucc are you using Danny boy? Both can have the Ecuador nationality. 

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25 minutes ago, san5324 said:

Dafucc are you using Danny boy? Both can have the Ecuador nationality. 

Okay, as long as they are female, they can teach English in China.

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I came to China with HAIDA from New Zealand and:

1. HAIDA made it simple to come to China
2. The conditions are better than the contract conditions I agreed to before arriving
3. HAIDA is a significant agency in this city

Fact: Recruitment companies profit from your work

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10 minutes ago, tanemcleay said:

I came to China with HAIDA from New Zealand and:

1. HAIDA made it simple to come to China
2. The conditions are better than the contract conditions I agreed to before arriving
3. HAIDA is a significant agency in this city

Fact: Recruitment companies profit from your work

No offense dude but I rather believe the many people on zee Internet than one person who almost have no posts here and magically arrived to save the face of zee company. 

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I have learned that I could earn double (almost triple my salary) working directly for the school or a different agency however the conditions are what I agreed to before I came to China and the working conditions within the school are much better than I had anticipated.

Therefore I'm not defending any recruitment agency or countering experiences of the many people on zee internet - simply sharing my experience of two months in China related to the topic post.........

Easy to get here; good school; pay is what I agreed to; have since learned I could earn more; am less naïve now for future opportunities; am happy with my work, flat, city.

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46 minutes ago, tanemcleay said:

I have learned that I could earn double (almost triple my salary) working directly for the school or a different agency however the conditions are what I agreed to before I came to China and the working conditions within the school are much better than I had anticipated.

Therefore I'm not defending any recruitment agency or countering experiences of the many people on zee internet - simply sharing my experience of two months in China related to the topic post.........

Easy to get here; good school; pay is what I agreed to; have since learned I could earn more; am less naïve now for future opportunities; am happy with my work, flat, city.

I suppose you can earn more if you perform the haka with only underwear and feather.

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1 hour ago, Dan.Tan said:

I suppose you can earn more if you perform the haka with only underwear and feather.

We all know why you wanna see that don't we Danny boy :creepy:

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On 2016/5/4 at 3:25 PM, Slythe said:

We all know why you wanna see that don't we Danny boy :creepy:

Shoo! Grow up, lad, I will never be interested in smelly,hairy whites... Unless they are female.

Damn, it's weird aussies are much different from europeans, I'm not sure of New Zealanders though.

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They pay badly. I think 10000 plus apartment should be the minimum. They also can give horrible apartments and will not fix anything unless you try to get them to T at least 100 times. With visa and things they are straightforward. You will not enjoy china on 7000 plus apartment. It's a bad wage. don t do it you lol regret it. Go training school, or find better recruiter if you have to. 

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I'm about to start as a 'recruiter', and while I agree the pay isn't the best, it is often still better than university pays (not that that's a defence - just stating a fact).

However, if you have a GOOD recruiter, then they should be a good liaison between you and the school you're with.

As for the apartments - for most recruiters, yeah, they probably don't care, because they're not as fussed over their long-term reputation.  In any case, apartment OR allowance should be offered - employee's choice!

7000 plus apartment in most cities will be enough to not only live off, but also have you saving (some). In lower tier cities, even easier! When I first got here, I was on 5K in a T3-4 city in Jiangxi. I was paying off my credit card quite easily... while dining out (and cooking at home). Effectively, I saved about 2000-3000RMb per month.. Not drinking (much) or smoking probably helped with that (like in every other place you can live).

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I have worked for Haida for 2 years. The pay is decent for what you do, I work 10 hours a week. I have my afternoons and weekends off to do my own thing, which includes supplementing my income. I've had zero problems with Haida . They pay when they are supposed to, they pay me what they are supposed too. They have given me zero grief. I've worked for training schools where I was teaching all the time, split shifts, go do "marketing events" at random places. With Haida, it's way more relaxed. 

Now this is my own personal experience, other people will have different experiences of course.

Edited by AndyHZ
silly grammar error
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I worked at a school with a HAIDA teacher, eventually found out the school was paying Haida 14,500 per month. The teacher saw 7,500 of that. That's a BIG chunk, 52% in fact. They told her they would pay for her TEFL Certificate before she came, then told her once she was here she needed to work for Haida for 2 years to get that. Suffice to say she quit after one year. Haida is a beginners trap for teachers coming to china for the first time (in my opinion). If you are a native speaker, have a degree and TEFL certificate you are much better off working directly for a school (with zero % of your wages going to people who don't deserve it).

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On 29/07/2016 at 11:42 PM, AndyHZ said:

I have worked for Haida for 2 years. The pay is decent for what you do, I work 10 hours a week. I have my afternoons and weekends off to do my own thing, which includes supplementing my income. I've had zero problems with Haida . They pay when they are supposed to, they pay me what they are supposed too. They have given me zero grief. I've worked for training schools where I was teaching all the time, split shifts, go do "marketing events" at random places. With Haida, it's way more relaxed. 

Now this is my own personal experience, other people will have different experiences of course.

"10 hours per week" was not Haida's doing - it was the school's.

You're contracted to work to a maximum number of hours per week, for a given salary per month... as per your contracts with both the agency and the school...

You got lucky! Other schools may have wanted someone for the 25 teaching hours, AND demanded office hours on top.

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On 13/10/2016 at 7:13 PM, Aaran Black said:

I worked at a school with a HAIDA teacher, eventually found out the school was paying Haida 14,500 per month. The teacher saw 7,500 of that. That's a BIG chunk, 52% in fact. They told her they would pay for her TEFL Certificate before she came, then told her once she was here she needed to work for Haida for 2 years to get that. Suffice to say she quit after one year. Haida is a beginners trap for teachers coming to china for the first time (in my opinion). If you are a native speaker, have a degree and TEFL certificate you are much better off working directly for a school (with zero % of your wages going to people who don't deserve it).

Did they give her the certificate before the 2 years? Or did they take the money from her pay and promised to reimburse at the end of 2 years? Or... neither - and expected her to work without the TEFL?

If the latter - that would be illegal.

Not that it should matter - cos such details should be IN THE CONTRACT....

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On 2/7/2017 at 0:38 PM, sainthood said:

"10 hours per week" was not Haida's doing - it was the school's.

You're contracted to work to a maximum number of hours per week, for a given salary per month... as per your contracts with both the agency and the school...

You got lucky! Other schools may have wanted someone for the 25 teaching hours, AND demanded office hours on top.

I've worked at 2 separate schools with Haida, always had about a 40 hour work month. Zero office hours, zero BS.

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On 10/13/2016 at 7:13 PM, Aaran Black said:

I worked at a school with a HAIDA teacher, eventually found out the school was paying Haida 14,500 per month. The teacher saw 7,500 of that. That's a BIG chunk, 52% in fact. They told her they would pay for her TEFL Certificate before she came, then told her once she was here she needed to work for Haida for 2 years to get that. Suffice to say she quit after one year. Haida is a beginners trap for teachers coming to china for the first time (in my opinion). If you are a native speaker, have a degree and TEFL certificate you are much better off working directly for a school (with zero % of your wages going to people who don't deserve it).

Most public schools can't offer a work permit. The only way to work legally is to have one or a green card, and I get my green card next year.

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On 5/31/2017 at 5:29 AM, noony1990 said:

brand new review of Haidas teachers here https://www.chinatefler.com/teaching-english-in-china/general-stuff/tefl-schools-and-reviews/china-experience-hangzhou-haida-review/ 

 

For quality assured teaching English in China positions click here for Noon Elite Recruitment. A british agency. 

Nice advertising your business for your first post.

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On 5/2/2016 at 7:57 AM, Gabby Bravo said:

Hello everyone!
I will be living in China soon as an english teacher through a recruiter called HAIDA.
Would like to know if anyone has heard of this recruiter agency and would like to share some comments about it?
Would really appreciate it!!

 

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On 2/13/2017 at 6:11 PM, AndyHZ said:

Most public schools can't offer a work permit. The only way to work legally is to have one or a green card, and I get my green card next year.

What makes you SO SURE that you will get a green card ? Only because you are eligible does not guarantees you will be given.

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